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L.A. Lens Blog
  • Loupe-Mounted Cameras Represent The Future Of Dental Video Communication
  • Teal Smallwood
  • Dental CameraDentistryL.A. LensMiniCam HDSurgical CameraVideo Dentistry
Loupe-Mounted Cameras Represent The Future Of Dental Video Communication

As advancements in dental video technology are made, dental practitioners are able to choose from a variety of video and imaging options that are easier to use and more patient friendly than ever before. By adopting the latest video technology, dentists and dental hygienists can deliver an enhanced level of treatment and improve practice efficiency and growth. 

The latest development in dental video technology comes in the form of a hands-free HD camera that attaches to loupes in order to help dental practitioners capture exactly what they see. Considered to be the next evolution of the intraoral camera, loupe-mounted cameras allow users to capture everything they see without interrupting their work.

To get to the point where loupe-mounted cameras could be a viable option for dental practices, technology had to come a long way. When the first intraoral camera was invented in 1987, not only did it cost $35,000, the images it produced were analog and had to be stored on floppy disks. The first few years after they were introduced, they achieved a market penetration of just a few percent, but now this number has quickly expanded to over 80% adoption due to the fact they are easier to use, more affordable, and lighter weight.

Despite their vast improvement, intraoral cameras still possess a number of drawbacks. One of their biggest flaws is that users must stop what they are doing to maneuver the camera and find the correct angle for the desired image. Additionally, dentists and dental hygienists must sterilize or re-cover the camera in between each patient.

Image quality is another complaint often associated with intraoral cameras, leading dental practitioners to opt for digital cameras instead. While digital cameras allow for HD resolution and exchangeable optics, they are still inconvenient for users who must stop what they are doing to operate the camera with both hands, then transfer the files to their computer. Additionally, digital cameras do not allow for live previewing during treatments.

Lightweight, loupe-mounted cameras represent the future in technological capability- both in terms of quality and functionality. By attaching the camera to loupes and headbands, operating the camera becomes effortless and the need for disinfecting vanishes. Additionally, video streams passively throughout procedures via a USB cord, diminishing the need for uploading.

The quality level loupe-mounted cameras offer is another major advancement for dental video and imaging technology. HD versions of loupe-mounted cameras provide users with both HD images and videos, as well as up to an 8 inch depth of field. With this level of resolution, videos are useful to clinicians and insurers.

With the amount of competition today, dental practices are held to a standard of care like never before. Practices are expected to provide excellent care for patients according to the available technology. Loupe-mounted cameras represent the future in communicating with patients. HD video creates a new and compelling way to show patient’s exactly what the dentist wants them to see.

One version of the loupe-mounted camera, from Los Angeles based L.A. Lens, has made significant advancements in not only the camera hardware, but the recording software as well. With L.A. Lens’ MiniCam HD, users are able to control recording and still HD images using a foot pedal. The videos and stills are streamed and stored on computers, requiring no extra time for editing, encoding, and uploading. Additionally, audio is recorded throughout the procedure, making documentation easy.

The MiniCam HD also comes with a private cloud system allowing users to share and access their videos wherever they are, using any device (including smartphones and tablets). Similar to YouTube links, video links can be sent in an email, which can then be shared with patients, specialists, technicians, and insurers.

By enabling dentists and hygienists to send personalized videos directly to the patient’s home, patients are more likely to appreciate what has been done for them and will be more willing to accept treatment recommendations. Additionally, the ability to capture clear images and transfer them throughout the office creates a critical link between front office administration and the dental operatories.

Dental video communication has come a long way and continues to evolve daily. Loupe-mounted cameras represent the new generation of dental video communication and documentation and give dental practitioners the ability to create a multitude of new service possibilities with improved quality of care. 

As advancements in dental video technology are made, dental practitioners are able to choose from a variety of video and imaging options that are easier to use and more patient friendly than ever before. By adopting the latest video technology, dentists and dental hygienists can deliver an enhanced level of treatment and improve practice efficiency and growth.

The latest development in dental video technology comes in the form of a hands-free HD camera that attaches to loupes in order to help dental practitioners capture exactly what they see. Considered to be the next evolution of the intraoral camera, loupe-mounted cameras allow users to capture everything they see without interrupting their work.

To get to the point where loupe-mounted cameras could be a viable option for dental practices, technology had to come a long way. When the first intraoral camera was invented in 1987, not only did it cost $35,000, the images it produced were analog and had to be stored on floppy disks. The first few years after they were introduced, they achieved a market penetration of just a few percent, but now this number has quickly expanded to over 80% adoption due to the fact they are easier to use, more affordable, and lighter weight.

Despite their vast improvement, intraoral cameras still possess a number of drawbacks. One of their biggest flaws is that users must stop what they are doing to maneuver the camera and find the correct angle for the desired image. Additionally, dentists and dental hygienists must sterilize or re-cover the camera in between each patient.

Image quality is another complaint often associated with intraoral cameras, leading dental practitioners to opt for digital cameras instead. While digital cameras allow for HD resolution and exchangeable optics, they are still inconvenient for users who must stop what they are doing to operate the camera with both hands, then transfer the files to their computer. Additionally, digital cameras do not allow for live previewing during treatments.

Lightweight, loupe-mounted cameras represent the future in technological capability- both in terms of quality and functionality. By attaching the camera to loupes and headbands, operating the camera becomes effortless and the need for disinfecting vanishes. Additionally, video streams passively throughout procedures via a USB cord, diminishing the need for uploading.

The quality level loupe-mounted cameras offer is another major advancement for dental video and imaging technology. HD versions of loupe-mounted cameras provide users with both HD images and videos, as well as up to an 8 inch depth of field. With this level of resolution, videos are useful to clinicians and insurers. 

With the amount of competition today, dental practices are held to a standard of care like never before. Practices are expected to provide excellent care for patients according to the available technology. Loupe-mounted cameras represent the future in communicating with patients. HD video creates a new and compelling way to show patient’s exactly what the dentist wants them to see.

One version of the loupe-mounted camera, from Los Angeles based L.A. Lens, has made significant advancements in not only the camera hardware, but the recording software as well. With L.A. Lens’ MiniCam HD, users are able to control recording and still HD images using a foot pedal. The videos and stills are streamed and stored on computers, requiring no extra time for editing, encoding, and uploading. Additionally, audio is recorded throughout the procedure, making documentation easy.

The MiniCam HD also comes with a private cloud system allowing users to share and access their videos wherever they are, using any device (including smartphones and tablets). Similar to YouTube links, video links can be sent in an email, which can then be shared with patients, specialists, technicians, and insurers. 

By enabling dentists and hygienists to send personalized videos directly to the patient’s home, patients are more likely to appreciate what has been done for them and will be more willing to accept treatment recommendations. Additionally, the ability to capture clear images and transfer them throughout the office creates a critical link between front office administration and the dental operatories.

Dental video communication has come a long way and continues to evolve daily. Loupe-mounted cameras represent the new generation of dental video communication and documentation and give dental practitioners the ability to create a multitude of new service possibilities with improved quality of care.

 

To find out more about the MiniCam HD, please click here

 

The L.A. Lens Team

  • Teal Smallwood
  • Dental CameraDentistryL.A. LensMiniCam HDSurgical CameraVideo Dentistry

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